Michigan lottery winner charged with welfare fraud

Published On: Apr 17 2012 09:56:12 AM EDT
Updated On: Apr 17 2012 07:54:37 PM EDT

A lawyer for a Michigan woman who continued to get food stamps after winning a $1 million lottery jackpot says his client plans to fight welfare fraud charges.

DETROIT -

A lawyer for a Michigan woman who continued to get food stamps after winning a $1 million lottery jackpot says his client plans to fight welfare fraud charges.

Twenty-five-year-old Amanda Clayton of Lincoln Park stood silently Tuesday at her arraignment in Lincoln Park's 25th District Court. A not guilty plea was entered on her behalf.
Defense lawyer Stanley Wise says he hopes to have charges dismissed at her next court hearing April 24. He didn't elaborate.
The Michigan attorney general's office earlier in the day announced two felony charges against Clayton. She was arrested Monday. The charges are punishable by up to four years in prison.
Clayton chose a $700,000 lump sum, before taxes, last fall after winning the jackpot on "Make Me Rich!" a Michigan lottery game show.

Local 4 Defenders revealed fraud in March

The case came to light when Local 4's Karen Drew confronted Clayton.

"I thought that they would cut me off, but since they didn't, I thought maybe it was okay because I'm not working," Clayton told Local 4.  

Full investigation: Lottery winner still using Bridge card

Local 4 was in the courtroom with Clayton on Tuesday. Tune in at 6 p.m. for details on her arraignment and exclusive video you'll only see on Local 4.

 

 

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