Congress considers bill to force TSA to donate spare change

Published On: Mar 13 2012 06:04:30 AM EDT
Updated On: Mar 13 2012 06:19:29 AM EDT

A bill that would require the Transportation Security Administration to donate money left behind at airport security checkpoints by airline passengers to benefit military members is making its way through Congress.

WASHINGTON -

A bill that would require the Transportation Security Administration to donate money left behind at airport security checkpoints by airline passengers to benefit military members is making its way through Congress.

House Transportation Security Subcommittee Chairman Mike Rogers (R-Ala.) said, "It would be a positive change to see that money spent each year on providing a welcoming and comfortable atmosphere at airports for our dedicated men and women of the Armed Services."

Rodgers added that the spare change bill would mark "the second time a bill in this Congress…would improve the nation's airports to better accommodate and support our military personnel."

FAST FACTS:

  • 2010-2011: TSA found $409,085.56 in unclaimed spare change left behind at TSA screening stations by passengers.
  • Under law, the unclaimed money goes back into Department of Homeland Security coffers.
  • Under House bill 2719, sponsored by Florida Rep. Jeff Miller (R) Chair of the House Veterans' Affairs Committee, the TSA would be forced to donate the spare change to United Service Organizations.
  • If approved by Congress, the money would be used to improve airport facilities to better accommodate and support military personnel.
  • The bill goes now to the full House Homeland Security Committee for consideration.

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