'Truth Squad' analyzes Michigan election ads

Published On: Oct 11 2012 06:25:30 PM EDT
Updated On: Oct 11 2012 06:43:29 PM EDT

A Thursday gathering in Royal Oak sorted out facts and fallacies in the swirl of advertising for and against statewide issues on the November Michigan ballot

ROYAL OAK, Mich. -

A Thursday gathering in Royal Oak sorted out facts and fallacies in the swirl of advertising for and against statewide issues on the November Michigan ballot.

A so-called "Truth Squad" from Michigan Radio hosted a gathering at Mark Riddley's Comedy Castle entitled " Issues and Ale."

They dissected the numerous ads for and against the ballot issues.

Rick Haglund of Michigan Radio was critical of an ad in support of a vote for a proposal calling for a public vote on a new international bridge.

"They just flat out, you know, lied," Haglund said.

The experts said ads on both sides of Proposal 2, the collective bargaining issue, are misleading.

An ad supporting Proposal 3, for alternate energy sources, claims the industry will create 94,000 jobs.  The truth squad reports the truth is a projection of 94,000 job years.

Rick Haglund also took issue with an ad opposing Proposal 3, which claims passage of the measure would cost $12 Billion.

"The $12 Billion actually is an estimate from Consumers Energy, which is one of the main funders of this ad," Haglund said.

Cathy Mosher of Royal Oak attended the gathering and said it is difficult to trust the ads.

"They are just geared toward jerking people's emotions," Mosher said.

TV viewers can expect to see many more of these ads between now and election day. 

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