Canned pumpkin puree

Published On: Aug 24 2011 12:34:50 PM EDT

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Wash your pumpkin to remove any dirt. Using a large chef's knife, cut the pumpkin into 6 or 8 wedges, depending on the size of the pumpkin.

The easiest way to remove the seeds and pulp is to use a filleting knife along the inside of the wedges. With a little practice, this will leave little or no scraping needed.

Arrange the pumpkin wedges in a large roasting or sheet pan and bake, uncovered, for one hour at 325 F, and two more hours at 300 F.

The meat should be tender all throughout, and not watery under the dry skin that formed. Turn off the oven and leave the door cracked for ventilation. Let the pumpkin cool and continue to dry for several more hours.

Remove the skin and any exceptionally dry or leathery parts, and puree thoroughly.

Please note that most of the dry surface of the meat is still sufficiently tender to be used, but probably not the stem corners. Because the pulp is so dry, it will take several minutes with the food processor, and a number of stirs and scrapes, before the pulp liquefies enough to turn over by itself and puree properly. Once it does this, a good minute or more of pureeing will result in a wonderfully smooth, pumpkin paste. Store in an air-tight container and keep in the refrigerator.

Reprinted with permission from PastryWiz.com.

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