Starbucks admits Strawberry Frappuccino contains crushed bugs

Published On: Mar 27 2012 08:19:34 AM EDT
Updated On: Mar 27 2012 09:15:52 AM EDT

Have you ever wondered how Starbucks makes their Strawberry Frappuccinos look so pink? The pink hue is thanks to crushed up insects.

DETROIT -

Have you ever wondered how Starbucks makes their Strawberry Frappuccinos look so pink? The pink hue is thanks to crushed up insects, according to new information provided by the coffee chain giant.

The company comes clean

In a statement released by Starbucks, the company has revealed that they use cochineal extract, which is the ground-up bodies of insects, as a dye for the popular rose-colored beverage.

About the bug

The ingredient is in fact harmless. Commonly used to help liven up the dull hues of jams, meats, cheese, baked goods, alcoholic drinks and more, cochineal extract has been used as a coloring agent in food and drinks for centuries. It has been deemed safe by the United States’ Food and Drug administration Bugs from mainly Mexico and South America are dried out before they are ground and used in the milky-based Frappuccino drink. Starbucks said it had decided to use cochineal extract to help limit the use of artificial ingredients in its products.

The company's statement

"At Starbucks, we strive to carry products that meet a variety of dietary lifestyles and needs," the statement read. "While the strawberry base isn’t a vegan product, it helps us move away from artificial dyes."




Comments

The views expressed below are not those of Click On Detroit, WDIV, or its affiliated companies. By clicking on "Post," you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and your comment is in compliance with such terms. Readers, please help keep this discussion respectful and on topic by flagging comments that are offensive or inappropriate (hover over the commenter's name and you'll see the flag option appear on right side of that line). And remember, respect goes both ways: Tolerance of others' opinions is important in a free discourse. If you're easily offended by strong opinions, you might skip reading comments entirely.

blog comments powered by Disqus