Winner of NBC's 'Million Second Quiz' from Farmington Hills

By Jamie Edmonds, Local 4 Sports, @jamie_edmonds, jedmonds@wdiv.com
Published On: Sep 20 2013 04:25:53 PM EDT
Updated On: Sep 20 2013 06:25:39 PM EDT

It’s a regular Friday at Farmington Hills High School, but the talk of the hallways is all about a special alumnus.

DETROIT -

It’s a regular Friday at Farmington Hills High School, but the talk of the hallways is all about a special alumnus.

"We’re all excited, I’ve been getting crazy emails," said Jeremy Gold a history teacher at the school.

The excitement is for former student Andy Kravis who just won the $2.6 million grand prize Thursday night on NBC’s "Million Second Quiz."

Gold is Kravis’ former quiz bowl teacher. Gold says he’d like to take credit for Kravis' big win, but says he can’t.

"I’d sure like to, but it’s all him," Gold said. "He’s thirsty for knowledge, always has been."

The 25-year-old Michigan native is no stranger to game shows.

Kravis competed in "Teen Jeopardy" as a 13-year-old; he competed in "Wheel of Fortune" as a student at University of Michigan; and he competed on "Who Wants to be a Millionaire."

But this is by far his biggest prize. So what makes him so good?

Gold said it is because Kravis is not afraid to take chances.

Kravis' dad, James, told Local 4 his son got "his memory and his mother’s brains." The family, who was in attendance in the audience Thursday night, couldn't be prouder.

Kravis said he’s going to pay off his law school loans with his winnings.

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